Changing the Game On Gender-Based Abuse

A Luncheon Featuring Naomi Tutu and Christina Hale

The Game Changers Forum brings together a stellar group of scholars, civic leaders and celebrities to explore the economic, social and medical impact of gender based abuse. It provides a unique opportunity to raise awareness of a common problem and to dialogue together as we contribute to solutions. The 2017 forum is sure to inspire and engage.

October 3, 11:30 AM – 1:30 PM | Doors Open at 11:00A

Butler University, Reilly Room| 704 W Hampton Dr., | Indianapolis, Indiana

General Admission: $40.00 | Student: $15.00 | Table of 8: $320.00

Purchase Tickets at: gamechangersforum2017.eventbrite.com

South Africa has the highest number of sexual assaults per capita than any other country in the world, with 1 in every 3 women being a victim of a sexual assault. Similarly to South Africa, Indiana has the second highest rate of sexual violence in the country, with 1 in every 5 women becoming a victim of rape. Despite these staggering figures, only 15% of all sexual assault cases are reported to authorities. Join us as we tackle this complex but ever so relevant issue with Naomi Tutu, Gail Masando and Christina Hale.

The challenges of growing up black and female in apartheid South Africa has led Naomi Tutu to her present work as an activist for human rights. Her professional experience ranges from being a development consultant in West Africa to coordinating programs on Race and Gender and Gender-Based Violence at the African Gender Institute at the University of Cape Town. In her speeches, Tutu blends the passion for human dignity with humor and personal stories. She is the third child of Archbishop Desmond and Nomalizo Leah Tutu.

Christina Hale is the CEO of Leadership Indianapolis and well known throughout Indiana as a servant leader. During her four years as a state representative from Indianapolis, she earned a reputation for effectiveness and bipartisanship. Before entering the political arena, she worked with Kiwanis International as the chief communications officer. A Purdue University graduate, she began her career as a newspaper reporter in Northern Indiana, then worked in state government for the Indiana Department of Commerce and the governor’s office.

A native of New York, Gail Masondo was the first African American woman producer of Special Projects for Warner Brothers. She went to South Africa two decades ago as co-Executive Producer of : A Place Called Hope – a project to help bridge the racial divide with music. There she met her husband and made South Africa home. She has spend the past twenty years straddling continents as a mentor and counselor to both victims and perpetrators of gender based abuse and human trafficking.

 

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